Teck sees strong demand for steelmaking coal in 2018

TORONTO (Reuters) – Teck Resources Ltd, the world’s second-biggest exporter of steelmaking coal, said on Wednesday that growing global steel production is expected to boost demand for its coal in 2018, though coal trade competition will also likely rise.

Vancouver-based Teck, which also mines copper, zinc, gold and oil sands, said it is “feeling pretty good about 2018” after reporting in-line financial results.

“Most of us forget what this feels like, but it’s certainly very good for commodity markets, and they are now demand driven, rather than supply driven,” Chief Executive Don Lindsay said on a conference call.

“We see continued strength in commodity prices and Teck is certainly well positioned to take advantage of that.”

Steelmaking coal demand is expected to keep climbing in 2018, Teck said, while ongoing logistics and production issues at key Australian mines support prices.

It is unclear how an expected recovery in Australian exports this year and coal trade rebalancing will affect pricing, but Teck said it can respond to changing markets.

Teck sold 6.4 million tonnes of steelmaking coal in the fourth quarter, at an average realized price of $170 per tonne.

It sees 2018 output of 26 million to 27 million tonnes of steelmaking coal. Production in 2019 to 2022 will range between 26.5 million and 27.5 million tonnes, despite this year’s closure of Coal Mountain operations.

Copper production is forecast at 270,000 to 330,000 tonnes in 2018 and 270,000 to 300,000 tonnes for 2019 to 2022. Zinc production is seen at 645,000 to 670,000 tonnes in 2018, dropping to between 575,000 and 625,000 tonnes in 2019 to 2022.

Teck expects its share of production from Fort Hills oils sands mine at 7.5 million to 9 million barrels of bitumen in 2018 and 14 million barrels in 2019 to 2022.

It holds a 20.89 percent stake in Fort Hills, which produced its first oil in January, with partners Suncor Energy and Total SA. Production is seen reaching at least 90 percent of capacity by year-end.

Lindsay said he hopes Teck will build up cash reserves from high commodity prices and see copper supplies tighten before moving ahead with its US$4.7 billion second-phase Quebrada Blanca project. Permits are expected in the first half of 2018 and a decision in the second half.

Shares of Teck, up nearly 15 per cent year-to-date, were about 1 per cent higher at C$37.72 at mid-session.

Reporting by Susan Taylor and Shubham Kalia; Editing by Meredith Mazzilli

 

Canadian Aluminum, Steel Must Be Excluded from U.S. Tariffs and Quotas: Steelworkers

USW states that Canada is a ‘partner,’ not a threat to American national security

TORONTO and MONTREAL, Feb. 16, 2018 /CNW/ – Canada is not among the “bad actors” engaged in unfair trade and dumping of aluminum and steel into the United States and must be excluded from potential U.S. tariffs and quotas, the United Steelworkers (USW) says.

“There is no justification to include Canada with countries that systematically violate trade laws and engage in the dumping of illegally subsidized aluminum and steel,” USW National Director Ken Neumann said following today’s release of a U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC) report on the impact of imported steel and aluminum on U.S. national security.

The DOC’s Section 232 report has recommended three separate options for American President Donald Trump to consider regarding steel and aluminum exports to the U.S., ranging from across-the-board tariffs, to tariffs for “bad actor” countries and exclusions for “good actor” countries. The president also can implement modified versions of any of the recommendations, or take no action at all.

“The intent of the DOC’s report is to respond to countries whose trade practices represent a threat to U.S. national security,” Neumann said.

“The report, as well as testimony provided by expert witnesses during the investigation stage, demonstrate that Canada is not one of the ‘bad actor’ countries that threaten U.S. interests,” added Marty Warren, USW District 6 Director (Ontario and Atlantic Canada).

The DOC report includes several positive references to Canada, characterizing it as a partner and supplier to the American aluminum industry, rather than a threat.

During the DOC’s Section 232 investigation, retired U.S. army brigadier general John Adams urged that Canada’s steel sector not be hit with tariffs.

“The one supplier in whom I have complete confidence is Canada. Not only do we currently have a steel surplus with Canada, but we share a border and have synergistic strategic, economic and national security interests,” Adams testified.

USW International President Leo W. Gerard also said Canada should be excluded from punitive actions that should be focused on bad actor countries including China, Egypt, India, Malaysia, Korea, Russia, Turkey and Vietnam.

“Our economies are very closely intertwined and we hope the U.S. government won’t threaten the steel and aluminum industries by taking punitive action,” said Steve Hunt, USW District 3 Director (Western Canada).

U.S. trade action against Canadian aluminum and steel would not serve the interests of the American economy, Steelworkers’ Quebec Director Alain Croteau said.

“Imposing tariffs or quotas on Canadian exports will result in job losses in the U.S. manufacturing sector and will increase prices for many goods and products. Workers on both sides of the border will lose,” Croteau said.

“Compared to other producers, Quebec’s aluminum sector is more environmentally friendly and produces much lower greenhouse gas emissions,” he added.

The USW also is calling for a strong response from the Canadian government to defend the Canadian aluminum and steel industries from unjustified tariffs and quotas.

“The government of Canada must act decisively to defend fair trade and the tens of thousands of Canadian families whose livelihoods depend on the aluminum and steel sectors,” Neumann said.

“The Canadian government should work with the U.S. in fighting the predatory and destructive trade practices of China and other bad actor countries.”

SOURCE United Steelworkers (USW)

Robert Allcock

Brother’s and Sister’s

We are saddened by the news of the passing of our brother Rob Allcock. As a senior 24 inch Mill Operator Rob was well respected and liked and will be missed by all. Our condolences go out to all the Family and Friends on Mr. Allcock.

RIP Brother

Safety Meetings

Brothers and Sisters,

On Monday Feb 12th  your OH&S committee’s from both Steel& Tubular have met with your executive to discuss ongoing issues regarding safety. Many issue were brought up surrounding lock outs, investigations, accountability , committee meeting minutes, work place inspections, etc.

On Tuesday Feb 13th all of these groups met with Pat Christie {VP Health, Safety and Environment} and his team to discuss issues that are going on in Regina. The discussion was very good and all of our concerns were laid out for Mr. Christie. The company has plenty of take away’s from this meeting and have committed to follow up meetings every couple months with our same group. There is also a meeting set up on the 14th to discuss on going safety issues in Tubular with Mr. Manson and Mr. Christie.

Please remember Safety before Production.

Right to Refuse

Brothers and Sisters,

Please take the time to read the below article and remember everyone has the right to refuse, everyone has the right to be safe. Please look out for yourself and others.

Article 14.05 Right to Refuse
(a) The Union recognizes and the Company accepts the
responsibility to make adequate provision for the safety
and health of the employees during the hours of their
employment.
(b) As per section 23 of the Occupational Health and Safety Act
and Regulations a worker may refuse to do any particular
act or series of acts at work which they have reasonable
grounds to believe are unusually dangerous to their health
or safety or the health and safety of any other person at the
place of employment, until sufficient steps have been taken
to satisfy them otherwise, or until the Joint Safety, Health
and Environment Committee or occupational health officer
has investigated the matter and advised them otherwise.
Should this section of the act be eliminated or revised to a
lesser standard this article shall then apply.
(c) No worker will be disciplined for exercising their right to
refuse unsafe work. The worker will be offered other work at
their regular job class until the matter is resolved. No other
employee will be assigned the work in question until such
time as the requirements specified in the Occupational
Health and Safety Act and Regulations dealing with the
right to refuse have been satisfied.
(d) The Joint Safety, Health and Environment Committee will
be given access to all Material Safety Data Sheets relevant
to products/chemicals used in the Plant. A copy of the
79
approved product request form as well as the product’s
MSDS sheet will be forwarded to the Co-Chairs of the Joint
Safety, Health and Environment Committee. Employees
will be trained on the safe handling and use of such
products/chemicals.

Tim Hortons

Ontario coffee drinkers are rightfully dismayed that the owners of some Tim Hortons franchises have chosen to cut back on their workers’ benefits, paid breaks and even tips in response to the minimum wage increase to $14 an hour.

Ontario workers are right to be concerned that there is nothing illegal about the behaviour of Tim Hortons franchisees in reducing benefits and paid breaks. That’s because Tim Hortons employees do not have the benefit of an enforceable collective agreement — they largely work at the mercy of their employer.

If Tim’s workers did have a union, these cutbacks would, of course, be in violation of their union contract and the union would ensure Tim’s was prevented from making such miserly and unilateral cuts.

The reason Tim’s employees and so many other workers don’t have the benefit of a union contract is that Ontario’s labour laws make it virtually impossible for workers in franchise operations to join unions.

The recent package of labour law changes passed by the Wynne Liberals did some good things for Ontario workers — most notably it included a long overdue increase to the minimum wage. But it is unfortunate that the government did virtually nothing to provide service sector workers, like the thousands of Tim’s employees, with real access to unionization and collective bargaining.

Our current system of labour relations was designed in the 1930s and ’40s when workplaces were very different — and it is profoundly ill-suited to accommodate collective bargaining at thousands of retail franchises across the province. It is very difficult to generate any real bargaining power by trying to unionize one Tim’s store at a time — let alone trying to negotiate at one, or even five, Tim’s stores among the hundreds spread across Ontario.

As a result, the overwhelming majority of retail franchise workers in Ontario are not unionized. And it is not for a lack of trying, both by unions and workers. Many unions have organized Tim Hortons, McDonald’s and Starbucks franchises, for example. But those efforts have ultimately failed to create any real union density in the sector because labour laws remain stacked against Ontario’s most vulnerable workers.

The Ontario government promised its labour law reforms would address the challenges created by growing precarious employment in small workplaces. In reality, it has left vulnerable workers exposed to precisely the unfair treatment we are seeing today.

The government took no action even though its own task force — the Changing Workplaces Review — received numerous submissions from unions and other organizations calling for legislation to allow broader sectoral bargaining in Ontario, similar to laws found in some sectors in Quebec and across much of Europe.

The government’s own task force also concluded that the current system of bargaining with a single franchisee is “unlikely to be viable.” The task force recommended a small change that would have allowed bargaining with multiple franchisees of the same franchisor. Sadly, the government rejected even this modest proposal.

Finally, the Wynne government also rejected a proposal from the entire labour movement that workers in all sectors should have the opportunity to join a union without employer interference, by simply signing a union membership card. The government’s rejection of this proposal virtually assures Tim’s workers who want to join a union that they can expect to be subjected to a legal campaign of anti-union coercion and harassment by their employer.

Premier Wynne claims to have modernized labour laws to protect Ontario workers and grow the middle class. But simply increasing the minimum wage will not stem growing inequality.

History demonstrates that unionization and collective bargaining are the most important factors in reducing inequality and growing the middle class. On that score, the Ontario government has given retail workers less than half a cup of coffee.

Marty Warren is the Ontario Director of the United Steelworkers

 

 

USW Potash Locals United Like Never Before Following Strategic Meetings

 

SASAKTOON, Sask., 12 January 2018 – The United Steelworkers Potash Locals have concluded two days of successful and productive meetings in Saskatoon, Sask., where local unions came together to discuss a number of issues important to Steelworkers who work in potash mines in the province.

 

USW Locals 189, 7458, 7689, 7656, 7552 and 7916 were joined by District 3 Director Stephen Hunt, Assistant to the Director Scott Lunny, Staff Representatives Mike Pulak, Phil Hayden and MC Breadner to take part in the strategic discussions.

 

The meeting follows on the heels of the merger between employers Agrium and Potash Corp. The new employer is Nutrien and the USW sees the merger as an opportunity to strengthen the collaboration between all potash locals.

 

“The importance of standing together, shoulder to shoulder, was recognized by the leadership of all USW locals. We know that by co-ordinating our efforts like never before we can ensure Steelworkers are treated with the respect and fairness they deserve,” says Darrin Kruger, President of USW Local 7552.

 

As USW members employed by Nutrien and Mosaic prepare to go into bargaining, the meeting was an opportunity to build power and create even greater synergy among potash workers. USW locals at Nutrien let the Mosaic locals know in no uncertain terms that they have their backs and vice-versa.

 

That unwavering, mutual support will help all locals achieve good things for members over the coming years, says Kim Wehner, President of USW Local 7689.

“When we stand united, we can achieve tremendous things for our members.”

 

A key discussion during the meetings was the rise in potash prices and the positive outlook for the industry.

 

USW District 3 Director Stephen Hunt congratulated the locals on their commitment to working together and says it’s how workers will continue to make progress at the bargaining table.

 

“From stem to stern, in every one of our potash locals and in every facet of our union, there is a strong commitment to speak with one voice and to stand united and together. I’m very proud that the leaders of all of our potash locals are working in solidarity to co-ordinate their efforts. It means good things ahead for our members,” says Hunt.

 

The USW Potash locals represent 2,500 potash workers in Saskatchewan.

 

Korean Steel Treated Like Doormat

Hard Time
Korean Steel Treated Like Doormat

Major steel importing countries such as Canada, India and Japan are joining the US in bashing Korean steel.
Seoul, Korea
26 December 2017 – 10:00am
Michael Herh
While the United States is highly likely to mount its pressure on outh Korea by way of Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962, major steel importing countries such as Canada, India and Japan are joining the US in bashing Korea. Korea’s steel export environment is also expected to get tougher next year as China reduced export tariffs.
According to the steel industry on December 25, Canada imposed anti-dumping duties of up to 88.1% on Korean carbon and alloy steel pipes, which will hold until 2022. Therefore, additional tariffs of 52.5%, 27.5% and 12.9% were levied on products of Hyundai Steel, SeAH Steel and Nexsteel, respectively.
Of note is an attitude of the Canadian government that is following the United States’s lead. The Canadian company which filed the lawsuit claimed a dumping margin of 58.2% of Korean products but the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) imposed an anti-dumping duty rate of 88%, saying that some Korean companies were not cooperating in handing in information to the CBSA. This is similar to a US case that imposed an anti-dumping duty of more than 60% by using the “adverse facts available (AFA)” provision, saying that POSCO did not submit data requested by the US last August. Canada recently tightened regulations on steel trade, including the final decision to impose an anti-dumping duty of up to 45.8 percent on Korea’s industrial steel structures in April.
It is not only Canada that imposed an anti-dumping duty on Korean steel products. On November 19, Japan made its preliminary determination of up to 74% of anti-dumping duties on 19 Korean steel pipe fittings. In April, India imposed anti-dumping duties of US$ 478 to US$ 561 per ton on hot rolled steel plates from Korea by 2021. Of the total 193 cases where export control measures were imposed on Korean products by countries around the world, 87 cases or 45% are involving steel and metal products. The United States is the largest country with 20 cases, followed by Canada (9 cases), India (8 cases) and Australia (8 cases). To top it off, Korean steel products are highly likely to become a common target all over the world if the US believes that Korean steel products will affect its security at the beginning of next year using Section 232.
To make matters worse, China, which had been the main culprit behind steel product oversupply in the world, decided to lower its export tariffs on its steel products starting next year. The Chinese government imposed 15% export tariffs on semi-finished products from 2007 as China’s steel exports rose but the tariffs were reduced to 5% to 10% by products. A recent recovery in Korea’s steel exports was largely attributed to Chinese authorities’ restraint on a flood of low-priced Chinese steel products as the Chinese government initiated a restructuring of the Chinese steel industry. If China’s steel products flood again, countries’ protectionism for steel products may become even stronger. “All major steelmakers are based on their domestic markets,” an industry official said. “If the steel industry becomes sluggish, nations will have no choice but to choose protective trade.”
Meanwhile, the US Department of Commerce will submit a steel industry survey report to US President Donald Trump in mid-January of next year in accordance with Section 232 and Trump will finally determine whether or not the US will impose sanctions against Korean steel products by April 16 of 2018. When Section 232 is triggered, Korea will lose a market amounting to 3 trillion to 4 trillion won a year. Thus, the Korean government is planning to file a lawsuit against the US AFA provision at the World Trade Organization (WTO).
The Korean Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy has been reportedly working to institute a lawsuit at the WTO after America’s application of the AFA provision to POSCO’s hot rolled steel plates in August of last year. Korea has refrained from bringing this case before the court of the WTO to reduce unnecessary friction with the United States in terms of diplomatic and security cooperation with the US and a renegotiation over the Korea-US Free Trade Agreement (FTA). However, as when the United States triggers Section 232 on Korean steel products, other countries including those of the European Union will follow suit and launch investigations into Korean steel products. Thus, the Korean government is clarifying its position to appeal to the WTO to cut off the vicious cycle.

Health Spending Account Deadline

Please take a look at the below article and make sure any receipts you have are sub-mitted before Jan 1.

 

Article 17.10 Health Spending Account
The Employer established an individual health spending
account on March 31, 2012. For all employees active on the
seniority list who have completed at least 750 hours of work
in the previous calendar year, the Employer will contribute
$100 to the employees individual Health Spending Account
by January 1 of each calendar year. Canada Revenue Agency
rules governing Health Spending Accounts will apply. The
parties agree that this will satisfy the Company’s obligation
regarding EI rebates.

Union Education

On January 18th the GERRAND,RATH and JOHNSON law firm will be holding it’s 5th annual Labour Law conference in Regina. Topics will be Drug Recognition Expert, Labour Relations Board Update and Arbitration update. The membership has approved up to 6 people to attend. Shop stewards wishing to attend please contact the office at 306-569-9663 or email m.day@usw5890.com.

Korean Imports

 

Seoul, Korea

11 December 2017 – 10:15am

Jung Min-hee

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) decided to impose anti-dumping duties of 4.1% to 88.1% on carbon and alloy steel pipes imported from South Korea, according to the industry source on December 10. The tariffs are effective until 2022 and the rates can be adjusted once a year during the period. The implementation of the tariffs is initiated on January 4, 2018.

Specifically, Husteel’s products are subject to a tariff of 4.1%. It is 47.8% for those of Hyundai Steel, 27.5% for those of Seah Steel, and 12.9% for those of Nexteel.

Carbon and alloy steel pipes are mostly used as pipes in various drainage facilities, gas pipes, and pipes in petrochemical plants. These days, Canada is importing an increasing amount of carbon and alloy steel pipes for infrastructure expansion. For the first 10 months of this year, Canada imported carbon and alloy steel pipes worth US$234.52 million in total, up 27.9% from a year earlier, and South Korean products accounted for 20.1% of the total imports.

In spite of the increase in local demand for the item, the South Korean companies’ export of the item to Canada is likely to be negatively affected by the anti-dumping duties. Canada has applied preliminary anti-dumping duties to the item since September this year and the companies’ exports have declined since that month.

Locker Replacement

Brother’s and Sister’s

Starting November 20th to the 23rd, the company has plans to do locker replacements over these 3 days. As mentioned before the Union is not participating in this. We will not participate or ask any Union representative to participate in anything that violates OH&S regulations. The company’s communication that they have put out states if lockers are not cleaned out by 7:30am they will be opened by Security with a Union Representative and Management Representative present. This information is false. As stated, this executive will not ask any member to violate OH&S and participate in this.

Your union asked 2 months ago what was going on with the change rooms and parking lot with the large amount of new hires, all to be ignored up until the last week when they wanted the “Unions Assistance”. Well they have been informed that we will not be assisting.

In Solidarity.

Sask Taxi Workers

Steelworkers’ Taxi Workers Council Will Provide Strong Voice for Taxi Workers in Western Canada

SASKATOON, Oct. 25, 2017  – The United Steelworkers (USW) commitment to providing a strong voice for taxi workers has taken a significant step forward today with the creation of the District 3 Taxi Workers Council, which will represent taxi drivers and dispatchers across Western Canada.

The Council brings together representatives from USW local unions to work together on the specific issues faced by taxi drivers and dispatchers, to provide leadership that will ensure that USW taxi workers are at the forefront of building a safe and fair taxi industry.

The Chair of the newly created District 3 Taxi Workers Council says taxi drivers and dispatchers are standing together to fight for their rights as workers.

“The establishment of the District 3 Taxi Workers Council demonstrates the USW’s commitment to ensuring that every taxi worker in every province is treated with the respect and dignity that they deserve,” says Malik Umar Draz of USW Local 2014 in Saskatoon.

Over two days of meetings, USW members employed in the taxi industry strategized about how to bring forward solutions to the many issues faced by taxi drivers and dispatchers; and how to grow their membership and ensure that more taxi workers benefit from the strength and voice that comes with belonging to the Steelworkers.

“As Canada’s most diverse union, we are proud of our record of fighting for workers in many different industries and sectors of the economy. I’m proud that we are building on our work representing taxi drivers and dispatchers by creating the District 3 Taxi Workers Council,” says USW District 3 Director Stephen Hunt.

“Together, we will make progress for taxi workers and ensure they have a seat at the table.”

From a growing number of incidents of workplace violence, to challenging working conditions and issues like Uber, Lyft and others, taxi workers face many daunting matters. The District 3 Taxi Workers Council will provide the forum and leadership to address these issues and pursue respect, fairness and dignity.

 

C.B.A

Brother’s and Sister’s

Please be advised that the bereavement language, new transition rates, night shift premiums, rates and cola  are now in affect.

Retro for night shift premium for Sept 13 to 16 will be paid on October 6th

Sept 17 the new cola rates went into affect and retro for Cola will also be paid on October 6th. Those dates are Aug 1, 2016 to Sept 16,2017.

As of October 1,2017 your new job class rates will be in affect. Retro for Aug 1st, 2017 to Sept 30, 2017 will be paid on October 20th, 2017.

Lump Sum to be paid on October 20th,2017. Which can be put into a DPSP account through Great West Life. That account info must be put in by October 6th,2017