News, Developments and Information

June Bargaining Update Part 2

 

Brothers & Sisters,

 

On June 20th to 22nd your USW 5890 Bargaining committee met with the company to discuss the remaining Regina local issues. We were able to sign off on most of the remaining articles including article 12.10{m} and language around early shift relief. Local issues still outstanding are Article 12.13{3 day layoff}, Article 14.14{ Health and Safety Representative} and Gantry Crane.

 

We would like to remind everyone that we have confirmed dates to meet with the company again on July 17 to 20th in Calgary for main table{monetary} discussions. The company has been informed that if we have not finished within those four days, we will be applying for mediation here in Regina.

 

As always collective bargaining is an important process for all of our members and their families. Your bargaining committee is committed to getting a fair deal for all of our members.

Your solidarity is important in everything we do. We would like to remind the membership that these bargaining updates come directly from your bargaining committees.

 

 

 

June Bargaining update

 

Brothers & Sisters,

 

On June 14th USW 6673 in Calgary held their strike vote and the results were 100% voted in favour of taking strike action. This follows the 99.3% we had here in Regina on May 25th.

 

We have confirmed dates to meet with the company again on June 20th to 22nd dealing with remaining Regina local issues and July 17th to 20th in Calgary for main table{monetary} discussions. The company has been informed that if we have not finished within those four days, we will be applying for mediation here in Regina.

 

As always collective bargaining is an important process for all of our members and their families. Your bargaining committee is committed to getting a fair deal for all of our members.

Your solidarity is important in everything we do. We would like to remind the membership that these bargaining updates come directly from your bargaining committees.

 

 

 

 

Support Your Bargaining Committee!

 

Remember

Solidarity Works!

 

Solidarity Forever!

 

Bargaining Committee USW 5890/6673

Buy Canadian Steel, Say MPs

Contractors on public works should buy Canadian steel, says the Commons trade committee. The recommendation follows a confidential 2016 Environment Canada memo that contemplated a carbon tariff on imports from foreign polluters.

“It is imperative that Canadian and foreign steel producers be subject to a level playing field,” wrote the trade committee in its report The Canadian Steel Industry’s Ability To Compete Internationally. “Global excess steelmaking capacity and the resulting dumping of foreign products into Canada have hurt Canadian steel producers.” Continue reading Buy Canadian Steel, Say MPs

Steelworkers Return from Washington: Everyone Wants a Negotiated Softwood Settlement but Path Forward Is Unclear

WASHINGTON, June 15, 2017 – After two intensive days of meetings with several U.S. Congressmen and Senators, the U.S. Trade Representative and the Department of Commerce, a delegation of Canadian Steelworkers heard the message loud and clear – a desire to negotiate a softwood lumber settlement sooner rather than later is shared across our borders.

“We had very constructive meetings. All parties were able to agree on one thing – a speedy settlement is in the best interests of both our countries and we need to get this done before the talks are polluted with other trade issues such as dairy or the reopening of NAFTA negotiations,” said the delegation’s leader, Bob Matters, Chair of the Wood Council of the United Steelworkers (USW). Continue reading Steelworkers Return from Washington: Everyone Wants a Negotiated Softwood Settlement but Path Forward Is Unclear

Canadian Forestry Workers Tell U.S. Officials: A Fair Softwood Agreement Is a Negotiated One

WASHINGTON – A delegation of Canadian members of the United Steelworkers (USW) from the wood products industry are telling U.S. politicians today that workers on both sides of the border will benefit from a negotiated settlement on lumber and the termination of unfair countervailing and anti-dumping duties imposed by the United States.

“The only way forward is together,” said Bob Matters, USW Canadian Wood Council Chair and leader of the delegation of nine Canadian forestry sector workers. “Canadians and Americans have a long history of working together and we are here this week to advocate for a fair deal that will benefit both Americans and Canadians.” Continue reading Canadian Forestry Workers Tell U.S. Officials: A Fair Softwood Agreement Is a Negotiated One

Profit Sharing Plan

All Bargaining Unit Employees

Our financial performance for the 1st quarter resulted in no payment being made under the plan.

Looking Forward
Our focus continues to be on safety, quality, improving our cost position and developing the products necessary to meet the critical demands of our customers.

Summer School Travel Itinerary

We are meeting at 6:30am, leaving at 7 am, at the office on June 10th. Coming back June 16th, late evening. We have to pick up a member from 5917 out of Moose Jaw on the way as well.

We have rooms booked at the Super 8 in Fernie again this year for the 10th as we could not get rooms at the lodge. We would like to leave  at 9:00 am on the 11th to Kimberly.

Also I have booked a tee time at the trickle creek golf resort for 11:09 am if anyone would like to join. There’s room for 2-6 more players.
If you want to add anything else to the message feel free to do so.
Kael Dolejsi
President
USW LU5917

3 Day layoff’s

With the high number of 3 day layoff’s being implemented in this last month, please make sure your total time lost has not exceeded 3 calendar days in this month. If so, please contact a shop steward.

Steelworkers News Release

Strong Strike Vote By Steelworkers In Response To Evraz Attacks

 

May 26, 2017

 

Regina – Members of United Steelworkers Local 5890 at Evraz Regina have voted 99.3% in favour of strike action in response to Evraz’s extreme concessionary demands.

 

Evraz Regina Steelworkers have been without a contact for nearly a year – the previous contract having expired in July 2016. Despite the union’s attempt to negotiate a fair collective agreement, Evraz management have launched an unprecedented attack on the working conditions of their own employees.

 

“This Russian-owned, American-managed company is extremely profitable, but their greed knows no bounds,” says USW western Canada Director Stephen Hunt. “Evraz is trying to squeeze out even more money by attacking the long-standing benefits of workers, including a demand to end certain pension benefits for retirees and removing a benefit for surviving spouses. It’s a sickening and shameful attack on vulnerable people.”

 

Other demands from Evraz management include:

 

  • 0% wage increase for 3 years and then 0.5% for 2 years
  • Removing Cost of Living Adjustments
  • Implement a two-tier wage system for new hires
  • Reduce overtime payments and scheduling
  • Alter the Long Term Disability Plan

 

“Every day Steelworkers at Evraz Regina do the hard work to make the steel that help builds our country and allow the company to be profitable. Instead of a fair deal that respects their work, Evraz management have declared war on their own employees. It’s a reckless decision that puts the viability of the company at risk at a time when they’ve just received a contract to provide pipe for the recently approved Trans Mountain pipeline,” says Keith Turcotte, USW Staff Representative.

 

“Our members built Evraz Regina and they are never going to accept this type of attack lying down. The exceptionally strong vote is a message to management that they should rethink the path they are heading down,” says Hunt.

 

USW Local 5890 represents approximately 900 members at Evraz Regina.

Monetary Exchange

This morning your bargaining committees from USW 5890/6673 met with the company to exchange monetary proposals. Evraz proposal contains significant concessions, 5 year duration with no wage increase in the first 3 years and a half percent in the 4th and 5th years.  Tomorrow we will be applying for mediation in Calgary. In Regina, on May 25th there will be a special membership meeting held followed by a Strike Vote. More details on location and time to follow. Feel free to talk to a bargaining committee member for further information.

USW South Sask Area Council

Below is some information regarding the 75th Anniversary Celebration being put on by the South Sask Area Council. Anyone wishing to attend or give feedback please email m.day@usw5890.com or call 306-569-9663

USW 75th ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

FAMILY EDUCATION DAY

Sponsored by South Sask Area Council

 

SEPTEMBER 9, 2017

 

BENGOUGH REGIONAL CAMPGROUND

 (1.15 mins. SW from Regina)

BAR-B-QUE LUNCH PROVIDED

 

We are looking for input and interest from our members for this event:

 

  1. Name and number attending

 

  1. Do you prefer golf or baseball or neither?

 

(if you wish to camp overnight – sites have been reserved –

you will be responsible for the cost)

 

Please complete below with your feedback/suggestions:

 

  1. Name                                            2
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

Tubular 3 day layoff

For all individuals who were not contacted by the company and sent home for the 3 day layoff please either call the office at 569-9663, email m.day@usw5890.com, s.mackie@usw5890.com or r.mckenzie@usw5890.com so we can compile a list and file a group grievance.

Canadian Steel and Trade Tribunal

 

Canadian Steel Producers Association Welcomes Canadian International Trade Tribunal Finding and Canada Border Services Agency Re-investigation on Rebar

OTTAWA, ON–(Marketwired – May 04, 2017) – The Canadian Steel Producers Association (CSPA) welcomes the Canadian International Trade Tribunal (CITT)’s recent finding that the dumping of concrete reinforcing bar originating in or exported from the Republic of Belarus, Chinese Taipei, the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China, Japan, the Portuguese Republic and the Kingdom of Spain has caused injury to the domestic industry. As a result of this finding, duties imposed by the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) in their final determination issued on April 3, 2017 will remain in place.

The CBSA investigation was initiated in response to a complaint filed by Canadian producers ArcelorMittal Long Products Canada, G.P., Gerdau Ameristeel Corporation and AltaSteel Ltd.

“We continue to appreciate CBSA’s and the CITT’s commitment through the investigation and public hearing process to ensuring that fair trade in imports of rebar will be respected,” said CSPA President Joseph Galimberti. “It is essential for domestic steel producers and their employees, that market-based competition in Canada is preserved. This is an important outcome for the 22,000 Canadians employed directly and the 100,000 employed indirectly in steel.”

The CSPA also welcomes the CBSA’s re-investigation to update the normal values and export prices respecting certain concrete reinforcing bar originating in or exported from the People’s Republic of China (China), the Republic of Korea and the Republic of Turkey, as well as the amount of subsidy of certain concrete reinforcing bar originating in or exported from China, in accordance with the Special Import Measures Act (SIMA).

This reinvestigation, initiated on May 1, 2017 and concluding by September 1, 2017, will also include an inquiry pursuant to section 20 of SIMA respecting the steel industry in China. Several recent section 20 inquiries on the Chinese steel industry by the CBSA have indicated that the domestic prices for rebar in China are substantially determined by the Government of China (GOC) and as a result, there is sufficient reason to believe that these prices are not substantially the same as they would be if they were determined in a competitive market.

The CSPA also notes that the reinvestigation will consider, in cases where changes occurred in domestic prices, market conditions or costs associated with the production and sales of the subject goods, or amounts of subsidy received, the responsibility of concerned parties to inform the CBSA of such changes in writing and in a timely manner. If the reinvestigation finds that concerned parties do not or did not properly notify the CBSA of substantial changes, or if they did not provide the information required to make any necessary adjustments to values, retroactive assessments of anti-dumping or countervailing duties may be issued.

The CBSA noted in its Notice of Reinvestigation that Agency has indications that substantial changes may have occurred during the period of investigation (October 1, 2016 to March 31, 2017) and that they were not advised by the exporters of these changes as required. If these substantial changes are confirmed by the CBSA during the re-investigation, retroactive assessments will be applied and impacted parties will be notified of such a decision.

The CSPA and its member companies believe in fair and effective enforcement of trade remedy laws which support Canada’s ability to quickly respond to dumped and subsidized imports. As such, we believe this reinvestigation, allowing for the application of retroactive duties if warranted, to be an important step in ensuring the fair trade of steel products in Canada.

“Our membership will continue to monitor and vigorously defend against unfairly traded, dumped and subsidized steel products,” said Galimberti. “The recent improvements that the Government of Canada has made to our trade remedy framework are very helpful, and we look forward to further legislative enhancements to address unfair trade in Canada, as announced in Budget 2017, coming into force in the near term.”

About CSPA:

The Canadian Steel Producers Association (CSPA) is the national voice of Canada’s $14B steel industry. Our member companies annually produce approximately 13 million tonnes of primary steel as well as over 1 million tonnes of steel pipe and tube products in facilities located across Canada. Domestic steel operations directly employ some 22,000 Canadians while supporting an additional 100,000 indirect jobs.

Unity in Collective Bargaining

As we are currently in collective bargaining we thought you would enjoy the attached video below. As our union and all its members do many important things to improve the lives of our members and their families. Collective Bargaining is one of the biggest strengths we have to achieve our goals for a better life for everyone. We hope you enjoy the video

SOLIDARITY

April Bargaining update

 Local 5890/6673

CHAIN BARGAINING UPDATE

 On April 24th to 28th your bargaining committees from USW 5890 &6673 met with the company to conclude common non-monetary proposals. Your union was prepared to exchange monetary proposals but unfortunately the company was not prepared so the exchange will be delayed. Although some progress was made with non-monetary language, the week didn’t go as anticipated. The company was not prepared to exchange monetary proposals because of the changes in management. That should be concerning considering there was more representation from the Camrose plant then our own Steel division.

We have a confirmed date to meet with the company on May 17th, 2017 to exchange monetary proposals. If you will remember we exchanged non-monetary proposals with the company on May 19th, 2016.

As always collective bargaining is an important process for all of our members and their families. Your bargaining committee is committed to getting a fair deal for all of our members.

Your solidarity is important in everything we do. We would like to remind the membership that these bargaining updates come directly from your bargaining committees.

 

 

Why a labour leader who backed Hillary Clinton is now drawn to Donald Trump’s side

AARON P. BERNSTEIN/REUTERSi

DAVID SHRIBMAN

PITTSBURGH

SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL

APRIL 21, 2017

What’s wrong with this picture from the White House Thursday?

There’s President Donald Trump, sitting at his Oval Office desk, the iconic yellow curtains behind him and a group of American grandees, including the Commerce Secretary, surrounding him. And at the centre of the picture is Leo Gerard, who’s not even an American and who is president of a union that backed Hillary Clinton in the November election.

That picture – capturing an unusual, even uncomfortable president-to-president moment – is a glimpse of how the isms have become wasms in American politics. Mr. Gerard, who grew up near Sudbury in Lively, Ont., and is the chief of the 1.2-million-member United Steelworkers, was plainly uneasy in the Trump White House. But on a day in which the 45th President also launched an unscripted attack on Canadian dairy-trade practices, Mr. Gerard felt he had a vital role to play.

“The important thing for my being there is that Canada’s not the problem that the United States has in the steel industry,” Mr. Gerard said in an interview Friday in his office, a 12th-floor aerie with a spectacular view of Pittsburgh’s three rivers. “The problem with the steel industries of both countries – Canada and the United States – is the onslaught of unfairly traded steel, primarily from China but also from Japan, South Korea and India.”

The occasion for Mr. Gerard’s White House appearance was Mr. Trump’s signature on a memorandum calling for an investigation that could lead to barriers to steel imports from China and other nations with steel industries – a move that pleased Mr. Gerard and that Mr. Trump said was aimed at helping the American workers who he said were “one of the primary reasons I’m sitting here today as President.” Mr. Trump cited national security and invoked half-century-old statute for the basis of his initiative.

Mr. Gerard’s union may have opposed Mr. Trump’s election, but its members supported many elements of the Trump political appeal – not so much a contradiction as a commentary on the impatience and frustration that blue-collar workers have in the second decade of the 21st century.

“In the industrial heartland – and I refuse to call it the Rust Belt – a number of our members voted for Trump because he talked about doing the things they believed needed to be done, especially rebuilding manufacturing,” Mr. Gerard said.

“No one really was as aggressive or assertive as he was. He spoke directly to their concerns.” Then he added: “Part of the difficulty is that he’s got to deal with a Republican majority in Congress that over the time I’ve been around has never really lifted a finger to make life better for workers. In fact, they’ve done the opposite.”

The route from Mr. Gerard’s youth, as the son of an Inco Limited miner and volunteer labour organizer, to Mr. Trump’s office took him through negotiations involving Wilbur Ross, now the Commerce Secretary in Mr. Trump’s cabinet. Labour leaders such as Mr. Gerard sometimes are exceedingly wary of commerce secretaries – Herbert Hoover was perhaps the most famous – and often are more congenial to labour secretaries.

But Mr. Gerard considers Mr. Ross, who has a history of rescuing bankrupt manufacturing companies, as a vital ally.

“Back in the start of the 21st century, we had a huge crisis in the steel industry – again – and we worked with Wilbur Ross and were able to save the majority of LTV and Bethlehem Steel,” said Mr. Gerard. “I can remember they were going to close LTV’s Cleveland operations, and we got support to keep it going from Wilbur Ross. Today, that Cleveland mill is one of the most modern, efficient mills in the world – and they were going to bulldoze the thing.”

It was the involvement this spring of Mr. Ross, and the contemporary crisis in the steel industry, that drew Mr. Gerard to Mr. Trump’s side, at least for a signing ceremony.

“Part of the reason I was willing to go to the thing with Trump was to make it understood that it’s not just steel,” Mr. Gerard said. “The same thing’s happening in aluminum, cement, glass. The trade laws don’t work. On both sides of the border, we have to fix the trade laws. The American and Canadian worker should not have to pay this price.

“Don’t tell me we can’t compete,” he continued. “We can’t compete against cheaters.” Mr. Gerard, who during the 2016 campaign criticized Mr. Trump’s companies for using imported steel, isn’t the only North American labour leader to find himself by the new President’s side. Leaders of the United Auto Workers and the Building Trades Union have favoured Trump initiatives in his first hundred days on behalf of the automobile industry and energy-pipeline interests, respectively.

In his youth, Mr. Gerard, now 70, sat on the basement stairs listening to stewards’ meetings conducted by his father. He signed on with a contractor doing work in the local nickel smelter one summer. Eventually, he abandoned his dream of becoming an economics professor. He first visited Toronto when he began to advance in the Canadian labour movement.

Mr. Gerard, whose Northern Ontario accent would be unremarkable in Sudbury but is a colourful presence in Pittsburgh, knows he is playing a difficult role in Mr. Trump’s United States. But as the president of the largest industrial union in North America, he is an experienced political hand and believes he has both a strategy and a tactic.

“What we did, after the election, was to indicate that if the President wanted to renegotiate NAFTA and have a big infrastructure program and re-energize and rebuild the manufacturing base, we would be ready to help him,” he said. “But at the same time, if and how it gets done is important. If [Mr. Trump] is going to rebuild infrastructure by having toll roads and all that jazz, that would shift the cost back to workers, that would not be the best way to rebuild the infrastructure.” But Mr. Gerard speaks as much as a Canadian as a labour leader.

“Part of my role is to make sure I’m a voice for our members on both sides of the border,” he said. “Steel, rubber, cement, glass – I make it clear Canada is not part of the problem.”

 

Union Education

On June 1st , 2017 there is The Progressive Discipline Seminar for Stewards being held at the Hotel Saskatchewan. For any stewards that would like to attend this 1 day seminar please contact m.day@usw5890.com or call the office at 306-569-9663.

Vacation Pay

It has come to the Union’s attention that for anyone that has put in to receive their vacation pay at the start of May it won’t be paid out until May 19th, 2017. The Union believes this should be paid out on the May 5th pay, if it has been requested. The union intends on submitting a grievance on this matter.

Spring 2017 Safetalk

Attached is the spring safetalk from USW District 3. Please take a look and since it is now 25 years since the Westray Mine explosion there has been a book put out called Hell’s History about the Westray explosion. If anyone would like a copy please come down to the office or email m.day@usw5890.com.

 

Safetalk – Spring 2017