News, Developments and Information

USW South Sask Area Council

Below is some information regarding the 75th Anniversary Celebration being put on by the South Sask Area Council. Anyone wishing to attend or give feedback please email m.day@usw5890.com or call 306-569-9663

USW 75th ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

FAMILY EDUCATION DAY

Sponsored by South Sask Area Council

 

SEPTEMBER 9, 2017

 

BENGOUGH REGIONAL CAMPGROUND

 (1.15 mins. SW from Regina)

BAR-B-QUE LUNCH PROVIDED

 

We are looking for input and interest from our members for this event:

 

  1. Name and number attending

 

  1. Do you prefer golf or baseball or neither?

 

(if you wish to camp overnight – sites have been reserved –

you will be responsible for the cost)

 

Please complete below with your feedback/suggestions:

 

  1. Name                                            2
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

Tubular 3 day layoff

For all individuals who were not contacted by the company and sent home for the 3 day layoff please either call the office at 569-9663, email m.day@usw5890.com, s.mackie@usw5890.com or r.mckenzie@usw5890.com so we can compile a list and file a group grievance.

Canadian Steel and Trade Tribunal

 

Canadian Steel Producers Association Welcomes Canadian International Trade Tribunal Finding and Canada Border Services Agency Re-investigation on Rebar

OTTAWA, ON–(Marketwired – May 04, 2017) – The Canadian Steel Producers Association (CSPA) welcomes the Canadian International Trade Tribunal (CITT)’s recent finding that the dumping of concrete reinforcing bar originating in or exported from the Republic of Belarus, Chinese Taipei, the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China, Japan, the Portuguese Republic and the Kingdom of Spain has caused injury to the domestic industry. As a result of this finding, duties imposed by the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) in their final determination issued on April 3, 2017 will remain in place.

The CBSA investigation was initiated in response to a complaint filed by Canadian producers ArcelorMittal Long Products Canada, G.P., Gerdau Ameristeel Corporation and AltaSteel Ltd.

“We continue to appreciate CBSA’s and the CITT’s commitment through the investigation and public hearing process to ensuring that fair trade in imports of rebar will be respected,” said CSPA President Joseph Galimberti. “It is essential for domestic steel producers and their employees, that market-based competition in Canada is preserved. This is an important outcome for the 22,000 Canadians employed directly and the 100,000 employed indirectly in steel.”

The CSPA also welcomes the CBSA’s re-investigation to update the normal values and export prices respecting certain concrete reinforcing bar originating in or exported from the People’s Republic of China (China), the Republic of Korea and the Republic of Turkey, as well as the amount of subsidy of certain concrete reinforcing bar originating in or exported from China, in accordance with the Special Import Measures Act (SIMA).

This reinvestigation, initiated on May 1, 2017 and concluding by September 1, 2017, will also include an inquiry pursuant to section 20 of SIMA respecting the steel industry in China. Several recent section 20 inquiries on the Chinese steel industry by the CBSA have indicated that the domestic prices for rebar in China are substantially determined by the Government of China (GOC) and as a result, there is sufficient reason to believe that these prices are not substantially the same as they would be if they were determined in a competitive market.

The CSPA also notes that the reinvestigation will consider, in cases where changes occurred in domestic prices, market conditions or costs associated with the production and sales of the subject goods, or amounts of subsidy received, the responsibility of concerned parties to inform the CBSA of such changes in writing and in a timely manner. If the reinvestigation finds that concerned parties do not or did not properly notify the CBSA of substantial changes, or if they did not provide the information required to make any necessary adjustments to values, retroactive assessments of anti-dumping or countervailing duties may be issued.

The CBSA noted in its Notice of Reinvestigation that Agency has indications that substantial changes may have occurred during the period of investigation (October 1, 2016 to March 31, 2017) and that they were not advised by the exporters of these changes as required. If these substantial changes are confirmed by the CBSA during the re-investigation, retroactive assessments will be applied and impacted parties will be notified of such a decision.

The CSPA and its member companies believe in fair and effective enforcement of trade remedy laws which support Canada’s ability to quickly respond to dumped and subsidized imports. As such, we believe this reinvestigation, allowing for the application of retroactive duties if warranted, to be an important step in ensuring the fair trade of steel products in Canada.

“Our membership will continue to monitor and vigorously defend against unfairly traded, dumped and subsidized steel products,” said Galimberti. “The recent improvements that the Government of Canada has made to our trade remedy framework are very helpful, and we look forward to further legislative enhancements to address unfair trade in Canada, as announced in Budget 2017, coming into force in the near term.”

About CSPA:

The Canadian Steel Producers Association (CSPA) is the national voice of Canada’s $14B steel industry. Our member companies annually produce approximately 13 million tonnes of primary steel as well as over 1 million tonnes of steel pipe and tube products in facilities located across Canada. Domestic steel operations directly employ some 22,000 Canadians while supporting an additional 100,000 indirect jobs.

Unity in Collective Bargaining

As we are currently in collective bargaining we thought you would enjoy the attached video below. As our union and all its members do many important things to improve the lives of our members and their families. Collective Bargaining is one of the biggest strengths we have to achieve our goals for a better life for everyone. We hope you enjoy the video

SOLIDARITY

April Bargaining update

 Local 5890/6673

CHAIN BARGAINING UPDATE

 On April 24th to 28th your bargaining committees from USW 5890 &6673 met with the company to conclude common non-monetary proposals. Your union was prepared to exchange monetary proposals but unfortunately the company was not prepared so the exchange will be delayed. Although some progress was made with non-monetary language, the week didn’t go as anticipated. The company was not prepared to exchange monetary proposals because of the changes in management. That should be concerning considering there was more representation from the Camrose plant then our own Steel division.

We have a confirmed date to meet with the company on May 17th, 2017 to exchange monetary proposals. If you will remember we exchanged non-monetary proposals with the company on May 19th, 2016.

As always collective bargaining is an important process for all of our members and their families. Your bargaining committee is committed to getting a fair deal for all of our members.

Your solidarity is important in everything we do. We would like to remind the membership that these bargaining updates come directly from your bargaining committees.

 

 

Why a labour leader who backed Hillary Clinton is now drawn to Donald Trump’s side

AARON P. BERNSTEIN/REUTERSi

DAVID SHRIBMAN

PITTSBURGH

SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL

APRIL 21, 2017

What’s wrong with this picture from the White House Thursday?

There’s President Donald Trump, sitting at his Oval Office desk, the iconic yellow curtains behind him and a group of American grandees, including the Commerce Secretary, surrounding him. And at the centre of the picture is Leo Gerard, who’s not even an American and who is president of a union that backed Hillary Clinton in the November election.

That picture – capturing an unusual, even uncomfortable president-to-president moment – is a glimpse of how the isms have become wasms in American politics. Mr. Gerard, who grew up near Sudbury in Lively, Ont., and is the chief of the 1.2-million-member United Steelworkers, was plainly uneasy in the Trump White House. But on a day in which the 45th President also launched an unscripted attack on Canadian dairy-trade practices, Mr. Gerard felt he had a vital role to play.

“The important thing for my being there is that Canada’s not the problem that the United States has in the steel industry,” Mr. Gerard said in an interview Friday in his office, a 12th-floor aerie with a spectacular view of Pittsburgh’s three rivers. “The problem with the steel industries of both countries – Canada and the United States – is the onslaught of unfairly traded steel, primarily from China but also from Japan, South Korea and India.”

The occasion for Mr. Gerard’s White House appearance was Mr. Trump’s signature on a memorandum calling for an investigation that could lead to barriers to steel imports from China and other nations with steel industries – a move that pleased Mr. Gerard and that Mr. Trump said was aimed at helping the American workers who he said were “one of the primary reasons I’m sitting here today as President.” Mr. Trump cited national security and invoked half-century-old statute for the basis of his initiative.

Mr. Gerard’s union may have opposed Mr. Trump’s election, but its members supported many elements of the Trump political appeal – not so much a contradiction as a commentary on the impatience and frustration that blue-collar workers have in the second decade of the 21st century.

“In the industrial heartland – and I refuse to call it the Rust Belt – a number of our members voted for Trump because he talked about doing the things they believed needed to be done, especially rebuilding manufacturing,” Mr. Gerard said.

“No one really was as aggressive or assertive as he was. He spoke directly to their concerns.” Then he added: “Part of the difficulty is that he’s got to deal with a Republican majority in Congress that over the time I’ve been around has never really lifted a finger to make life better for workers. In fact, they’ve done the opposite.”

The route from Mr. Gerard’s youth, as the son of an Inco Limited miner and volunteer labour organizer, to Mr. Trump’s office took him through negotiations involving Wilbur Ross, now the Commerce Secretary in Mr. Trump’s cabinet. Labour leaders such as Mr. Gerard sometimes are exceedingly wary of commerce secretaries – Herbert Hoover was perhaps the most famous – and often are more congenial to labour secretaries.

But Mr. Gerard considers Mr. Ross, who has a history of rescuing bankrupt manufacturing companies, as a vital ally.

“Back in the start of the 21st century, we had a huge crisis in the steel industry – again – and we worked with Wilbur Ross and were able to save the majority of LTV and Bethlehem Steel,” said Mr. Gerard. “I can remember they were going to close LTV’s Cleveland operations, and we got support to keep it going from Wilbur Ross. Today, that Cleveland mill is one of the most modern, efficient mills in the world – and they were going to bulldoze the thing.”

It was the involvement this spring of Mr. Ross, and the contemporary crisis in the steel industry, that drew Mr. Gerard to Mr. Trump’s side, at least for a signing ceremony.

“Part of the reason I was willing to go to the thing with Trump was to make it understood that it’s not just steel,” Mr. Gerard said. “The same thing’s happening in aluminum, cement, glass. The trade laws don’t work. On both sides of the border, we have to fix the trade laws. The American and Canadian worker should not have to pay this price.

“Don’t tell me we can’t compete,” he continued. “We can’t compete against cheaters.” Mr. Gerard, who during the 2016 campaign criticized Mr. Trump’s companies for using imported steel, isn’t the only North American labour leader to find himself by the new President’s side. Leaders of the United Auto Workers and the Building Trades Union have favoured Trump initiatives in his first hundred days on behalf of the automobile industry and energy-pipeline interests, respectively.

In his youth, Mr. Gerard, now 70, sat on the basement stairs listening to stewards’ meetings conducted by his father. He signed on with a contractor doing work in the local nickel smelter one summer. Eventually, he abandoned his dream of becoming an economics professor. He first visited Toronto when he began to advance in the Canadian labour movement.

Mr. Gerard, whose Northern Ontario accent would be unremarkable in Sudbury but is a colourful presence in Pittsburgh, knows he is playing a difficult role in Mr. Trump’s United States. But as the president of the largest industrial union in North America, he is an experienced political hand and believes he has both a strategy and a tactic.

“What we did, after the election, was to indicate that if the President wanted to renegotiate NAFTA and have a big infrastructure program and re-energize and rebuild the manufacturing base, we would be ready to help him,” he said. “But at the same time, if and how it gets done is important. If [Mr. Trump] is going to rebuild infrastructure by having toll roads and all that jazz, that would shift the cost back to workers, that would not be the best way to rebuild the infrastructure.” But Mr. Gerard speaks as much as a Canadian as a labour leader.

“Part of my role is to make sure I’m a voice for our members on both sides of the border,” he said. “Steel, rubber, cement, glass – I make it clear Canada is not part of the problem.”

 

Union Education

On June 1st , 2017 there is The Progressive Discipline Seminar for Stewards being held at the Hotel Saskatchewan. For any stewards that would like to attend this 1 day seminar please contact m.day@usw5890.com or call the office at 306-569-9663.

Vacation Pay

It has come to the Union’s attention that for anyone that has put in to receive their vacation pay at the start of May it won’t be paid out until May 19th, 2017. The Union believes this should be paid out on the May 5th pay, if it has been requested. The union intends on submitting a grievance on this matter.

Spring 2017 Safetalk

Attached is the spring safetalk from USW District 3. Please take a look and since it is now 25 years since the Westray Mine explosion there has been a book put out called Hell’s History about the Westray explosion. If anyone would like a copy please come down to the office or email m.day@usw5890.com.

 

Safetalk – Spring 2017

29th Annual SFL Summer Camp

The 29th annual SFL summer camp is slated for August 27th to September 1st. It’s a 6 day camp for kids aged 13-16 focusong on issues for young people including social injustice and equality. For more information please check the link below. If you are interested in submiting your childs name please call the office at 569-9663 or email m.day@usw5890.com

SFL summer camp

March Bargaining Update

 

 USW 5890/6673

CHAIN BARGAINING UPDATE

 Brothers & Sisters,

On March 21st to 24th your bargaining committees from USW 5890 &6673 met with the company and went over our common non-monetary proposals. This was a productive week and much was accomplished. We were able to sign off on language for articles 4.07,5.01,7.02,8.09 1{i},17.04,17.07,17.08,17.09,17.12 and Appendix “D” in the Regina CBA and articles 12.06,17.12, Appendix “A”, Lines of Progression and an accompanying letter on how the changes to Appendix “A” will be implemented in the Calgary CBA.

We have confirmed dates to meet with the company again on April 25th, 26th , 27th and 28th. With only a few non-monetary items left on the table, it is expected, after we work our way through those, that at some point during those dates we will be exchanging monetary proposals with the company. It must be noted, among other things, that the company still has a proposal for Mandatory Overtime on the table. Be assured that your Bargaining Committee will remain strong and continue to oppose this proposal through to the end.

As always collective bargaining is an important process for all of our members and their families. Your bargaining committee is committed to getting a fair deal for all of our members.

Your solidarity is important in everything we do. We would like to remind the membership that these bargaining updates come directly from your bargaining committees.

Support Your Bargaining Committee!

Remember

Solidarity Works!

 

House of Commons meeting on Chinese Steel dumping.

The president of the Windsor-Essex Regional Chamber of Commerce will be raising concerns about Canada’s competition with the Chinese steel industry before a House of Commons committee Tuesday.

The chamber’s Matt Marchand said China dumping steel into Canada has been a significant issue for the country and the Windsor area.

The problem, according to Marchand, is Chinese companies do not follow the same labour and environmental regulations as Canadians and they have a surplus of steel which they are selling to other countries at much lower costs.

“They’re not a market economy and asking our entrepreneurs and business community to compete against China is something that I don’t think we should be asking them to do in the current context,” he said.

The federal standing committee on international trade is working on a report on the ability of Canada’s steel industry to compete internationally. Marchand said Canada is at a disadvantage because Chinese steel companies are essentially owned by their government.

“With all the power they have, they don’t respond to market forces, they’re not interested in profits or losses,” said Marchand. “Basically, it’s a government department that’s manufacturing steel.”

Locally, the Harrow community in Essex is home to home to steel producer Atlas Tube. According to Marchand, they employ over 200 people, have exports of $250 million per year and generate $1 million in taxes for the town.

“Why should we have one set of rules for Atlas Tube and then another set of rules for Chinese companies that don’t play by those rules?” he asked.

The chamber has previously brought this issue up with its counterparts in Hamilton and Sault Ste. Marie. They have sent a letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and received national support at the Canadian Chamber of Commerce annual general meeting in September.

Essex MP Tracey Ramsey, the vice-chair of the trade committee, helped set up the meeting for the chamber. She made the motion at the committee level to begin this study, which she expects to be completed in late spring.

“We are not the only country to be a target of this, but other countries have improved their trade remedy systems so they can address this in a better way and we are looking for Canada to do the same,” said the NDP’s trade critic.

Canada has become an “easy target” for the Chinese steel industry, said Ramsey, and the government should catch up to what Australia and the U.S. have done to limit the effects of dumping.

“Across all party lines, there has been a serious understanding of how important this is to the Canadian steel industry,” she said. “For myself, I just continue to highlight the importance of jobs that exist in my riding of Essex.”

Michael Cautillo, president and CEO of the Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority, said in November 2015 all 22,000 tonnes of steel for the upcoming Gordie Howe International Bridge will come from the U.S. and Canada.

Ramsey said it’s important for the federal government to lead by example on all of its infrastructure projects in this context.

Marchand said he is also concerned the federal government is entertaining the idea of giving marketing economy status to China through the World Trade Organization. That would “give them even more access in terms of trade,” he said.

Governments of both the U.S. and China are taking “a very aggressive stance with their business community,” and Canada needs to think about how it will compete, said Marchand.

“I guess we’re going to be asking the question to the Canadian government: ‘To what extent are we going to aggressively defend Canadian businesses in the context of China dumping steel?'”

by Tom Morrison

Tom Morrison is a Windsor-based journalist. @TomMorrison12 on Twitter

Steel layoff notice

On Friday March 17th, the Union given notification of the upcoming layoff in the Steel division. This will take effect April 3rd and will roughly effect 100 employee’s. The information we were provided with Friday was that this would roughly be a 7 to 10 day outage. Please keep an eye on your schedule and if you have any concerns contact your supervisor or the Human resources department.

Steel Trade with U.S

Brothers and Sisters,

On March 16th  members from your executive along with District 3 director Steve Hunt and Staff Representative Leslie McNabb met with the Honorable Ralph Goodale to discuss the impact  Steel trade with the U.S has on Steelworkers in Western Canada.

Much of our discussion was about the impact a “buy american” policy in the U.S would affect our members and Evraz as a whole. Mr. Goodale was very receptive to the talks and we left him with a few things to take back to the cabinet and the Prime Minister. We made the point that like our American counterparts, Canada’s steel industry has suffered from global overcapacity and the dumping of steel products primarily by China, Japan, Korea and Turkey. Without maintaining fair trade, and fair access to markets the Canadian government must be as vigorous as our American counterparts in defending Canadian workers. In the U.S unions have the direct ability to file trade complaints and in Canada we can not. An issue we would like to see changed.

Recent discussions in the U.S regarding the Keystone Pipeline have often incorrectly referred to Canadian made pipe from Regina as “Russian” pipe. The discussions  ignore that a significant portion of the pipeline will also traverse within Canada. They also ignore that there is no comparable pipeline manufacturer within the U.S that can produce the volume and quality that we can.

 

We will continue to fight for our jobs!

In Solidarity

 

Education

The annual USW Summer School and Progressive Discipline Seminar for Stewards are coming up in June. Anyone that would like to put their name forward to attend please call the office @ 569-9663 or email m.day @usw5890.com.

Vacation Requests

As March 15th approaches please remember to get your vacation requests submitted in accordance with the following article.

 

Article 11.01
Each employee shall be entitled to an annual vacation with pay in accordance with the employee’s length of service as provided in the Saskatchewan Labour Standards Act. Eligibility shall be based on years of continuous or accumulated service as of May 1st of each year.
Annual vacation requests must be submitted by March 15 for the period of May 1 to April 30 of the following year. The approved schedule of annual vacations submitted by March 15 will be posted by April 1. Vacation requests submitted after March 15 will be approved on a first come first serve basis and a response will be provided within two weeks of the request.
The Company shall make every reasonable effort to ensure that an employee’s vacation request is approved, consistent with operational requirements.
Where an employee transfers from one department to another, they shall take their vacation in accordance with the schedule established in their old department, unless there is an adverse operational impact in their new department
The Company agrees to issue any prior year’s vacation pay upon the request of the employee. This request must be made in writing and submitted to the employee’s supervisor.

February bargaining update

 

Brothers and Sisters,

 

On February 14th your bargaining committee met with the company for 4 days of local non-monetary issues .Over those 4 days we were able to sign off on some language articles and what was left will be dealt with at main table common bargaining with the Calgary bargaining committee{USW 6673}  The Calgary committee will be meeting with the company on March 7th to 10th to discuss their remaining local non-monetary issues.

On March 1st and 2nd both committee’s are meeting to go over our common non-monetary proposals before we meet with the company on March 21st to the 24th to discuss common issues.

As we mentioned at our pre bargaining meetings, we will be sending out monetary surveys in the next couple weeks. Please take the time to fill those out and get them back to us.

 

In solidarity,

 

 

 

Your Local 5890 Bargaining Committee

Fatality

Fatality Alert

It with great sadness I inform you that on January 30, 2017, Ivor Lundin a member from USW Local 1-423 in Kelowna B.C. was fatally injured while working at Tolko Industries Ltd in Kelowna, BC, Canada.
Our condolences go out to the family and co-workers of the deceased.

Emergency Response Team member Ed Kent from Local 1-424 went to assist the family and the Local Union during this tragic event.
The Local Union, RCMP, Coroners Service, Transportation Safety Board, Transport Canada and Worksafe BC are still investigating this incident. Continue reading Fatality

Workers Compensation

Your Union executive is looking for any members who have had issues with their Workers Compensation claims. That could involve any number of reasons, but not through any fault of your own. If you have or know someone who has been or is on Workers Compensation and have had any issues please either email m.day@usw5890.com or call the office @306-569-9663

In Solidarity.